Review: ‘Mean Baby,’ by Selma Blair

In her memoir, “Mean Baby,” the actor opens up about daily life with multiple sclerosis and the different identities she has juggled all her life.


Who Was George Floyd?

“His Name Is George Floyd,” by Robert Samuels and Toluse Olorunnipa, is a thorough recounting of the life of the man whose brutal murder set off historic protests.


Book Review: ‘The Familia Grande,’ by Camille Kouchner

A best seller in France, Camille Kouchner’s “The Familia Grande” is an indictment of incest that started a national reckoning.


Review: ‘An Island,’ by Karen Jennings

The antihero of Karen Jennings’s latest builds a stone wall between himself and the world that broke him.


Review: ‘What Artists Wear,’ by Charlie Porter

What artists’ wardrobes can tell us about their methods, their personal lives and politics — and even about ourselves.


Selma Blair Has a Soft Spot for Holocaust Books

“I am drawn to the idea of continuing to bear witness to that horrible time,” says the actor, whose new book is “Mean Baby: A Memoir of Growing Up.”


John Waters Talks About His First Novel

The filmmaker and author’s latest book is “Liarmouth: A Feel-Bad Romance.”


11 New Books We Recommend This Week

Suggested reading from critics and editors at The New York Times.


Everything You Thought You Knew, and Why You’re Wrong

A scientist and policy analyst examines the systems that rule our world, denounces easy solutions and makes the case for uncertainty.


The Secrets of an American Fortune, Told Four Ways

“Trust,” by Hernan Diaz, examines the human costs of wealth in a novel that keeps revising itself.


Review: ‘The Mind and the Moon,’ by Daniel Bergner

In “The Mind and the Moon,” Daniel Bergner explores how much we know — and how much we don’t — about mental health.


A Novel Imagines the Next Wave of Refugees: Americans

In Ken Kalfus’s novel “2 A.M. in Little America,” a civil war in the United States has led to mass migration in an unfriendly world.


New Crime Fiction

In “Bad Actors,” Mick Herron’s latest Slough House novel, a group of maladroit agents confronts a scandal in their own office.


What Is the Federal Reserve’s Role in the Economy? Bernanke Knows.

Ben S. Bernanke’s “21st Century Monetary Policy” is an insider’s account of the operations of the Fed.


A Time-Traveling Daughter Just Wants Some Time With Her Dad

Emma Straub’s new novel, “This Time Tomorrow,” is a love letter to a bygone era on the Upper West Side and a timeless family bond.


A Family of Geniuses and Their Search for Transcendence

Daniel Guebel’s novel “The Absolute” is a sweeping, century-spanning genealogy of creative obsessions.


America’s Wars Are Fought by Relatively Few People. That’s a Problem for Phil Klay.

Klay’s essay collection, “Uncertain Ground,” examines what war has come to mean in the United States.


The Challenge of Making Art in a Culture That Cheapens It

In Alexander Maksik’s “The Long Corner,” a writer leaves a dreary city for an enigmatic, possibly sinister artists’ colony.


A Colette for Our Times

A new translation by Rachel Careau breathes fresh life into Colette’s shockingly modern novels of May-December love.


A Tale of Well-Meaning Visitors Reflects a Colonial Legacy

In Audrey Magee’s novel “The Colony,” an artist and a linguist go to work on an Irish island during a politically fraught season.


Jhumpa Lahiri Leaves Her Comfort Zone

An acclaimed author traces a journey away from her native language and discovers new selves in the process.


When You’re This Hated, Everyone’s a Suspect

In “Who Killed Jane Stanford?” Richard White takes on a 1905 murder — and seamy cover-up — that has fascinated scholars for generations.


Review: ‘Time Zone J’ and ‘Flung Out of Space’

“Time Zone J,” by Julie Doucet, and “Flung Out of Space,” by Grace Ellis and Hannah Templer, inhabit their feminism in different and fascinating ways.


Review: ‘River of the Gods,’ by Candice Millard

“River of the Gods” is a fast-paced tale of the absurdly dangerous quest by two friends turned enemies to solve the geographic riddle of their era.


A Medical History of Transplant Surgery That’s Not for the Squeamish

Paul Craddock’s gory and engrossing “Spare Parts” takes on ancient skin grafts, modern plastic surgery and everything in between.

 

In Nell Zink’s ‘Avalon,’ a Young Woman Is Too Busy for Revenge

Zink’s new novel is about a girl’s life with a menacing stepfamily, an elusive love interest and a great ambition.


What Happened to The Believer?

The magazine, bought by a marketing company, briefly hosted clickbait content. Scandal ensued. After a flurry of negotiation, it is now back with its first publisher, McSweeney’s.


In ‘The Letters of Thom Gunn,’ an Unusual Mix of Pleasures

Gunn was not a confessional poet, but he spilled his guts in rowdy, funny, filthy, intensely literate correspondence.


A Colette for Our Times

A new translation by Rachel Careau breathes fresh life into Colette’s shockingly modern novels of May-December love.


America’s Wars Are Fought by Relatively Few People. That’s a Problem for Phil Klay.

Klay’s essay collection, “Uncertain Ground,” examines what war has come to mean in the United States.


John Waters Talks About His First Novel

The filmmaker and author’s latest book is “Liarmouth: A Feel-Bad Romance.”


Who Was George Floyd?

“His Name Is George Floyd,” by Robert Samuels and Toluse Olorunnipa, is a thorough recounting of the life of the man whose brutal murder set off historic protests.


What Is the Federal Reserve’s Role in the Economy? Bernanke Knows.

Ben S. Bernanke’s “21st Century Monetary Policy” is an insider’s account of the operations of the Fed.


A Time-Traveling Daughter Just Wants Some Time With Her Dad

Emma Straub’s new novel, “This Time Tomorrow,” is a love letter to a bygone era on the Upper West Side and a timeless family bond.


A Family of Geniuses and Their Search for Transcendence

Daniel Guebel’s novel “The Absolute” is a sweeping, century-spanning genealogy of creative obsessions.


The Challenge of Making Art in a Culture That Cheapens It

In Alexander Maksik’s “The Long Corner,” a writer leaves a dreary city for an enigmatic, possibly sinister artists’ colony.


A Tale of Well-Meaning Visitors Reflects a Colonial Legacy

In Audrey Magee’s novel “The Colony,” an artist and a linguist go to work on an Irish island during a politically fraught season.


Jhumpa Lahiri Leaves Her Comfort Zone

An acclaimed author traces a journey away from her native language and discovers new selves in the process.


When You’re This Hated, Everyone’s a Suspect

In “Who Killed Jane Stanford?” Richard White takes on a 1905 murder — and seamy cover-up — that has fascinated scholars for generations.


Review: ‘Time Zone J’ and ‘Flung Out of Space’

“Time Zone J,” by Julie Doucet, and “Flung Out of Space,” by Grace Ellis and Hannah Templer, inhabit their feminism in different and fascinating ways.


Review: ‘An Island,’ by Karen Jennings

The antihero of Karen Jennings’s latest builds a stone wall between himself and the world that broke him.


Review: ‘Mean Baby,’ by Selma Blair

In her memoir, “Mean Baby,” the actor opens up about daily life with multiple sclerosis and the different identities she has juggled all her life.


Katsumoto Saotome, Who Preserved Stories of Tokyo Firebombing, Dies at 90

He compiled six books of survivors’ recollections of the 1945 attack. He also founded (without government support) a memorial museum.


Larry Woiwode, Who Wrote of Family, Faith and Rural Life, Dies at 80

Raised in North Dakota and rural Illinois, he was a literary star in New York City in the 1970s. But he left the limelight to raise a family on a North Dakota farm.


How Hollywood and the Media Fueled the Political Rise of J.D. Vance

“Hillbilly Elegy,” a best-selling memoir that became a star-studded film, raised the profile of the onetime “Never Trump guy” who won an Ohio primary with the help of the former president.


Book Review: ‘The Familia Grande,’ by Camille Kouchner

A best seller in France, Camille Kouchner’s “The Familia Grande” is an indictment of incest that started a national reckoning.


Review: ‘River of the Gods,’ by Candice Millard

“River of the Gods” is a fast-paced tale of the absurdly dangerous quest by two friends turned enemies to solve the geographic riddle of their era.


Carrie White, Hair Stylist to the Stars, Is Dead at 78

Her Beverly Hills salon was a party scene where she roller-skated among her glamorous clientele, including Elizabeth Taylor and Warren Beatty.


‘You Will Stay Silent’: Photographs From Behind the Iron Curtain

Images taken in the 1970s and ’80s provide a glimpse into life under autocracy.


An Outsider Takes an Inside Look at the Oxford ‘Chums’ Who Run the U.K.

Simon Kuper has written a book that captures Boris Johnson and other future Conservative politicians when they were ambitious and misbehaving undergrads, planning their rise to power.