Book Review: ‘The Secret Lives of Numbers,’ by Kate Kitagawa and Timothy Revell

“The Secret Lives of Numbers,” by Kate Kitagawa and Timothy Revell, highlights overlooked contributions to the field by ancient thinkers, non-Westerners and women.


Book Review: ‘Liars,’ by Sarah Manguso

The aggrieved wife who narrates Sarah Manguso’s novel “Liars” may or may not be a reliable source about her monster of a husband.


Book Review: ‘Feh: A Memoir,’ by Shalom Auslander

Misery makes for good company in Shalom Auslander’s second memoir, which finds him self-deprecating, drug-dabbling, envious and, oy, middle-aged.


Book Review: ‘Guilty Creatures,’ by Mikita Brottman

A true-crime case that could only happen in Florida is at the heart of Mikita Brottman’s “Guilty Creatures.”


Book Review: ‘Desperately Seeking Something,’ by Susan Seidelman

In the memoir “Desperately Seeking Something,” Susan Seidelman’s life is as full of twists, charm and happy endings as one of her iconic movies.


Book Review: ‘A Question of Belonging,’ by Hebe Uhart

The simple pleasures keep coming in this keenly observed collection by the Argentinian writer Hebe Uhart.


Colson Whitehead Looks Back at ‘The Underground Railroad’

The first in a series of conversations with authors appearing on our “Best Books of the 21st Century” list.


Lewis H. Lapham, Longtime Editor of Harper’s, Dies at 89

Born into a patrician family, he used Harper’s and later his own Lapham’s Quarterly to denounce what he saw as the hypocrisies and injustices of a spoiled United States.


Rosa Ross, Late-Blooming Author of Asian Cookbooks, Dies at 86

She was, she said, unable to cook a basic meal into her mid-20s. But she went on to a successful career as a restaurateur and an authority on Asian cuisine.


If A.I. Is Coming for Comedy Writers, Simon Rich Is Ready

The author of humorous short stories finds emotional connections in tales that engage with tech. But he’s more interested in the ties between humans.


The Collapse of Romance Writers of America

The group worked for decades to build the profile of the genre and its writers. Now romance fiction is booming — but the R.W.A. has filed for bankruptcy. What happened?


Read These Children’s Books About the Olympic Games and Sports

Colorful primers, inspirational biographies and books by former champions will get kids excited for the Paris Games — and teach valuable lessons along the way.


Book Review: ‘A Hunger to Kill,’ by Kim Mager with Lisa Pulitzer

In “A Hunger to Kill,” the former homicide detective Kim Mager recalls a career-defining investigation.


Walter Shapiro, Political Columnist With a Contrarian Streak, Dies at 77

He brought to his writing a sharp sense of humor, honed in stand-up comedy clubs, and never pulled punches even though he was an unabashed Democrat.


Writing Helped Her Realize She Was a Woman. It Also Made Her Famous.

Camila Sosa Villada, an Argentine transgender author, first inhabited a female voice in stories she wrote as a child. Now her novels are translated in more than 20 languages and being adapted for the screen.


Robert Gottlieb’s Books Go Up for Sale

Bibliophiles and film fans leafed through hundreds of books that once belonged to the eminent editor Robert Gottlieb.


Book Review: ‘Catalina,’ by Karla Cornejo Villavicencio

Karla Cornejo Villavicencio’s fiction debut, “Catalina,” brings readers into the life and struggles of a blue-collar brainiac from Ecuador.


Book Review: ‘The Quiet Damage,’ by Jesselyn Cook

In “The Quiet Damage,” Jesselyn Cook traces the effects of the conspiracy theory on the spouses, children and siblings of believers.


Book Review: ‘The Bluestockings,’ by Susannah Gibson

A new book by Susannah Gibson spotlights the 18th-century Bluestockings, who aspired to have their writings and ideas accorded the same respect as men’s.


A New Era for the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles Begins

As a comic book series to honor the Turtles’ 40th anniversary debuts, here’s a look back at their milestones.


From Naples to New Orleans, Murder and Mayhem

Our crime columnist on four new novels.


Harry Crews, Barry Hannah, Larry Brown and the Rough South

Harry Crews, Barry Hannah and Larry Brown were part of a Southern writers’ movement that centered dissidents and outsiders. They’re still worth reading.


2 Los Angeles Novels as Stylish and Wild as the City Itself

Elizabeth Stromme’s noir about a writer for hire; Karen Tei Yamashita’s magic realist dystopia.


Key Terms From RNC That Capture the Trump Era

A partial lexicon of modern Republicanism.


Book Review: ‘Autocracy, Inc.,’ by Anne Applebaum

In “Autocracy, Inc.,” the Pulitzer Prize-winning historian takes account of the financial institutions and trade deals that have helped spread tyranny across the world.

 

Martin Amis: An Appreciation

Our critic assesses the achievement of Martin Amis, Britain’s most famous literary son.


Book Review: ‘NB by J.C.,’ by James Campbell

“NB by J.C.” collects the variegated musings of James Campbell in the Times Literary Supplement.


In ‘Fires in the Dark,’ Kay Redfield Jamison Turns to Healers

In “Fires in the Dark,” Jamison, known for her expertise on manic depression, delves into the quest to heal. Her new book, she says, is a “love song to psychotherapy.”


The Detective Novel ‘Whose Body?,’ by Dorothy L. Sayers, Turns 100

Dorothy L. Sayers dealt with emotional and financial instability by writing “Whose Body?,” the first of many to star the detective Lord Peter Wimsey.


Book Review: ‘Dom Casmurro,’ by Machado de Assis

“Dom Casmurro,” by Machado de Assis, teaches us to read — and reread — with precise detail and masterly obfuscation.


Book Review: ‘The Late Americans,’ by Brandon Taylor

Brandon Taylor’s novel circulates among Iowa City residents, some privileged, some not, but all aware that their possibilities are contracting.


Martin Amis’s Best Books: A Guide

The acclaimed British novelist was also an essayist, memoirist and critic of the first rank.


The Best Romance Novels of 2024 (So Far)

Looking for an escapist love story? Here are 2024’s sexiest, swooniest reads.


What Book Should You Read Next?

Finding a book you’ll love can be daunting. Let us help.


Lewis H. Lapham, Longtime Editor of Harper’s, Dies at 89

Born into a patrician family, he used Harper’s and later his own Lapham’s Quarterly to denounce what he saw as the hypocrisies and injustices of a spoiled United States.


Rosa Ross, Late-Blooming Author of Asian Cookbooks, Dies at 86

She was, she said, unable to cook a basic meal into her mid-20s. But she went on to a successful career as a restaurateur and an authority on Asian cuisine.


If A.I. Is Coming for Comedy Writers, Simon Rich Is Ready

The author of humorous short stories finds emotional connections in tales that engage with tech. But he’s more interested in the ties between humans.


Book Review: ‘The Secret Lives of Numbers,’ by Kate Kitagawa and Timothy Revell

“The Secret Lives of Numbers,” by Kate Kitagawa and Timothy Revell, highlights overlooked contributions to the field by ancient thinkers, non-Westerners and women.


The Collapse of Romance Writers of America

The group worked for decades to build the profile of the genre and its writers. Now romance fiction is booming — but the R.W.A. has filed for bankruptcy. What happened?


Read These Children’s Books About the Olympic Games and Sports

Colorful primers, inspirational biographies and books by former champions will get kids excited for the Paris Games — and teach valuable lessons along the way.


Book Review: ‘A Hunger to Kill,’ by Kim Mager with Lisa Pulitzer

In “A Hunger to Kill,” the former homicide detective Kim Mager recalls a career-defining investigation.


Book Review: ‘Feh: A Memoir,’ by Shalom Auslander

Misery makes for good company in Shalom Auslander’s second memoir, which finds him self-deprecating, drug-dabbling, envious and, oy, middle-aged.


Walter Shapiro, Political Columnist With a Contrarian Streak, Dies at 77

He brought to his writing a sharp sense of humor, honed in stand-up comedy clubs, and never pulled punches even though he was an unabashed Democrat.


Writing Helped Her Realize She Was a Woman. It Also Made Her Famous.

Camila Sosa Villada, an Argentine transgender author, first inhabited a female voice in stories she wrote as a child. Now her novels are translated in more than 20 languages and being adapted for the screen.


Robert Gottlieb’s Books Go Up for Sale

Bibliophiles and film fans leafed through hundreds of books that once belonged to the eminent editor Robert Gottlieb.


Book Review: ‘Catalina,’ by Karla Cornejo Villavicencio

Karla Cornejo Villavicencio’s fiction debut, “Catalina,” brings readers into the life and struggles of a blue-collar brainiac from Ecuador.


Book Review: ‘Guilty Creatures,’ by Mikita Brottman

A true-crime case that could only happen in Florida is at the heart of Mikita Brottman’s “Guilty Creatures.”


Book Review: ‘Desperately Seeking Something,’ by Susan Seidelman

In the memoir “Desperately Seeking Something,” Susan Seidelman’s life is as full of twists, charm and happy endings as one of her iconic movies.


Book Review: ‘Liars,’ by Sarah Manguso

The aggrieved wife who narrates Sarah Manguso’s novel “Liars” may or may not be a reliable source about her monster of a husband.


Book Review: ‘The Quiet Damage,’ by Jesselyn Cook

In “The Quiet Damage,” Jesselyn Cook traces the effects of the conspiracy theory on the spouses, children and siblings of believers.