Meet Vashti Harrison, Belle of the Best-Seller Lists

This author and illustrator is a mainstay across multiple categories. She hopes her work broadens the horizons of young readers.


Steve Inskeep Is Drawn to Books With Nuanced Female Characters

“Years ago I read everything by Hemingway and Raymond Carver. It’s a different experience to read Elif Shafak and Lauren Groff.”


A Novel Asks: What if Women Were Forbidden From Doing It All?

Sophie Mackintosh’s “Blue Ticket” imagines a dystopian world in which a girl’s fate is chosen for her.


The Day the White Working Class Turned Republican

David Paul Kuhn’s “The Hardhat Riot” recounts a little-remembered event and traces its significance to the politics of the present day.


‘Every Work of American Literature Is About Race’: Writers on How We Got Here

Amid the most profound social upheaval since the 1960s, these novelists, historians, poets, comedians and activists take a moment to look back to the literature.


The Baby-Sitters Club Taught Me Everything I Needed to Know About Literary Fiction

The wildly popular series was marketed to girls. But its nuanced depiction of friendship provided a 9-year-old boy with an education that “boy books” did not.


10 New Books We Recommend This Week

Suggested reading from critics and editors at The New York Times.


Jules Feiffer on His Long, Varied Career

Feiffer talks about his new picture book and more, and Steve Inskeep discusses “Imperfect Union.”


Psychological Thrillers That Will Mess With Your Head

In these four deeply unsettling novels, nothing is as it seems.


Leo Tolstoy vs. the Police

Why the great Russian novelist’s critique of state-sponsored violence bears thinking about now.


When James Baldwin and Langston Hughes Reviewed Each Other

Authors aren’t allowed mutual reviews in the Book Review anymore, but in the 1950s there was a moment of kismet.


How a Writer With a Ph.D. in Psychology Became a Poker Champ

In “The Biggest Bluff,” Maria Konnikova uses her own experience learning to beat the odds at poker to examine how much of life is chance and how much self-determined.


The Language of Friendship, as Heard in a Dublin Pub

In Roddy Doyle’s novel “Love,” a pair of lifelong drinking buddies reconnect to discuss life’s amusements and regrets.


Considering the American Voice

Irving Howe wrote for the Book Review about American literature — “moving from visions to problems, from ecstasy to trouble, from self to society” — on July 4, 1976. “Land of the free? Yes, but also home of the exploited.”


New in Paperback: ‘The Yellow House’ and ‘Night Boat to Tangier’

Six new paperbacks to check out this week.


Feminists, Poetic Pretensions and Other Letters to the Editor

Readers respond to recent issues of the Sunday Book Review.


What Keeps America Divided?

“Let Them Eat Tweets,” by Jacob S. Hacker and Paul Pierson, examines the ways in which the wealthy control the Republican Party.


What Is the Status of Trump’s ‘Big, Beautiful Wall’?

In “14 Miles,” his exploration of life on the border, DW Gibson reveals the reality and fantasy of the president’s desired wall.


Can Political Satire Outpace Reality? 3 Books Toss Their Hats in the Ring

Christopher Buckley’s “Make Russia Great Again,” Jessica Anthony’s “Enter the Aardvark” and the anthology “The Faking of the President” all have fun with American politics.


‘Blue Ticket,’ by Sophie Mackintosh: An Excerpt

An excerpt from “Blue Ticket,” by Sophie Mackintosh


‘Rigged,’ by David Shimer: An Excerpt

An excerpt from “Rigged,” by David Shimer


A Search for U.F.O.s Leads to Utopian Dreams in This Debut Novel

In Brian Castleberry’s “Nine Shiny Objects,” a broad cast of characters seek a different way of life in 20th-century America.


New Audiobooks, From Thomas Cromwell to the World of Darkness

A selection of recent audiobooks of note; plus, a peek at what our colleagues around the newsroom are reading.


How Generations of Russians Have Tried to Influence American Elections

David Shimer’s “Rigged” provides the history and context behind Moscow’s interference in the 2016 election.


Brave Teenage Refugees Seek a Home of the Free

In Jenny Torres Sanchez’ “We Are Not From Here,” three Guatemalan teenagers embark on a harrowing journey through Mexico to the U.S. border.

 

‘A Conflicted Cultural Force’: What It’s Like to Be Black in Publishing

An author, literary agent, marketer, publicist, editors and booksellers talk about how race affects their careers — and the books you read.


Duchess Goldblatt Is a Riddle, Wrapped in a Mystery, Inside a Twitter Account

“Becoming Duchess Goldblatt” is a memoir by the writer behind a beloved fictional character whose fans include Lyle Lovett and Celeste Ng.


The Baby-Sitters Club Taught Me Everything I Needed to Know About Literary Fiction

The wildly popular series was marketed to girls. But its nuanced depiction of friendship provided a 9-year-old boy with an education that “boy books” did not.


‘Begin Again’ Calls on James Baldwin to Make Sense of Today

Eddie S. Glaude Jr.’s book, combining elements of biography, criticism and memoir, looks to Baldwin for instruction and guidance.


‘Every Work of American Literature Is About Race’: Writers on How We Got Here

Amid the most profound social upheaval since the 1960s, these novelists, historians, poets, comedians and activists take a moment to look back to the literature.


16 Books to Watch For in July

A memoir from the poet Natasha Trethewey; “Hamnet,” Maggie O’Farrell’s novel about Shakespeare; and “Too Much and Never Enough,” an exposé about President Trump by his niece.


Jules Feiffer on His Long, Varied Career

Feiffer talks about his new picture book and more, and Steve Inskeep discusses “Imperfect Union.”


Lonnie Wheeler, 68, Dies; Helped Ballplayers Tell Their Stories

A longtime sportswriter, he collaborated with Hank Aaron, Bob Gibson and Mike Piazza on their autobiographies. “I was there,” he once said, “to make the subject more literary.”


Rudolfo Anaya, a Father of Chicano Literature, Dies at 82

His coming-of-age novel “Bless Me, Ultima” reframed the way many in New Mexico viewed their own history, even as school districts tried to ban it.


How Do We See Each Other in a ‘Market Society’?

A graphic review of Karl Polanyi’s seminal work “The Great Transformation,” which charted the social effects of capitalism.


Considering the American Voice

Irving Howe wrote for the Book Review about American literature — “moving from visions to problems, from ecstasy to trouble, from self to society” — on July 4, 1976. “Land of the free? Yes, but also home of the exploited.”


New in Paperback: ‘The Yellow House’ and ‘Night Boat to Tangier’

Six new paperbacks to check out this week.


Feminists, Poetic Pretensions and Other Letters to the Editor

Readers respond to recent issues of the Sunday Book Review.


What Keeps America Divided?

“Let Them Eat Tweets,” by Jacob S. Hacker and Paul Pierson, examines the ways in which the wealthy control the Republican Party.


What Is the Status of Trump’s ‘Big, Beautiful Wall’?

In “14 Miles,” his exploration of life on the border, DW Gibson reveals the reality and fantasy of the president’s desired wall.


10 New Books We Recommend This Week

Suggested reading from critics and editors at The New York Times.


‘The Baby-Sitters Club’ Defies and Exceeds Expectations

With a fresh voice and a winning cast, this Netflix update of the popular book series is the throwback that 2020 needs.


Descendants of Suffragists Reflect on the Fight for Women's Right to Vote

One hundred years after the 19th Amendment, suffragists’ descendants consider how far we’ve come and how far we still have to go.


This Profile of Charlie Kaufman Has Changed

How do you write about Hollywood’s most self-referential screenwriter at a destabilizing moment in history? It takes more than one draft.


Poem: On Sullivan’s Island

At this crucial time of reckoning in American racial justice, this poem asks “What work … besides witness?"


Can Political Satire Outpace Reality? 3 Books Toss Their Hats in the Ring

Christopher Buckley’s “Make Russia Great Again,” Jessica Anthony’s “Enter the Aardvark” and the anthology “The Faking of the President” all have fun with American politics.


Steve Inskeep Is Drawn to Books With Nuanced Female Characters

“Years ago I read everything by Hemingway and Raymond Carver. It’s a different experience to read Elif Shafak and Lauren Groff.”


Meet Vashti Harrison, Belle of the Best-Seller Lists

This author and illustrator is a mainstay across multiple categories. She hopes her work broadens the horizons of young readers.


The Day the White Working Class Turned Republican

David Paul Kuhn’s “The Hardhat Riot” recounts a little-remembered event and traces its significance to the politics of the present day.


‘Blue Ticket,’ by Sophie Mackintosh: An Excerpt

An excerpt from “Blue Ticket,” by Sophie Mackintosh