Nonfiction: A Memoir of Black Life in the ‘Other America’

In “Survival Math,” Mitchell S. Jackson tells his family story of living in Oregon and reckons with the interplay of racism and patriarchy in his own life.


Nonfiction: The Complex Literary Friendship Between Langston Hughes and Zora Neale Hurston

In “Zora and Langston,” Yuval Taylor revisits the relationship that laid much of the groundwork for black American literature in the 20th century.


Nonfiction: An Intimate Portrait of Sandra Day O’Connor, First Woman on the Supreme Court

“First: Sandra Day O’Connor,” by Evan Thomas, is a richly detailed life of the pathbreaking justice.


Fiction: A Cosmic Being Dies in Yoga Class. Then Things Get Really Weird.

Kathryn Davis’s novel “The Silk Road” is full of provocative mysteries: Are its characters many or one? Where are they going? Have they witnessed a murder?


Nonfiction: The ‘Enigma’ Who Is the Chief Justice of the United States

Joan Biskupic’s “The Chief” examines John Roberts’s life and his career on the Supreme Court.


Editors’ Choice: 7 New Books We Recommend This Week

Suggested reading from critics and editors at The New York Times.


The Book Review Podcast: A Violent Summer in Chicago

Alex Kotlowitz discusses “An American Summer: Love and Death in Chicago,” and John Lanchester talks about his new novel, “The Wall.”


Fiction: Helen Oyeyemi Dishes Up Magic in Her New Novel, ‘Gingerbread’

She’s taken old fairy tales, seasoned them with 20th-century history and pop-culture references, and frosted them with whimsical, even bizarre details.


Nonfiction: The Truth Is Hard. But for a New York Times Lawyer, Defending It Is Fun.

In his review, Preet Bharara calls David McCraw’s “Truth in Our Times” a behind-the-scenes look at the newspaper’s legal battles with the Trump administration and others.


Essay: When Science Fiction Comes True

Sci-fi writers gave us satellite communication, army tanks, tablets, CCTV and the internet — before these things existed in real life. What explains their powers of foresight?


Fiction: A Writer Who Finds Grace Beneath the Violence in His Stories

David Means’s latest collection, “Instructions for a Funeral,” is filled with adulterers and criminals, railroad bums and wharf rats and other castaways.


Nonfiction: Maria Popova Weaves Together Stories of Human Ingenuity

In “Figuring,” Popova roams over 400 years of science and poetry, highlighting women who have added to the history of creativity and invention.


Fiction: An Arab-American Poet Asks What It Means to Belong to Two Cultures, or None

In her debut collection, “Invasive Species,” the Egyptian immigrant Marwa Helal plumbs the complications of nationhood and inclusion.


New & Noteworthy

A selection of books published this week; plus, a peek at what our colleagues around the newsroom are reading.


Fiction: A Road-Paving Job Takes On a Sinister Allure in Dave Eggers’s New Novel

The author’s eighth novel, “The Parade,” is a parable-like story featuring two unnamed men on assignment in an unnamed country in the wake of a civil war.


The Best Cookbooks for Kids

Books that will inspire children to get into the kitchen and cook.


The Book Review Podcast: Isaac Mizrahi on His New Memoir

The fashion designer discusses “I.M.,” and David McCraw talks about “Truth in Our Times.”


From Our Archives: Revisiting the Shaker Community in Michael Downing’s “Perfect Agreement”

In his 1997 book “Perfect Agreement,” Downing mixes the academic world with the people and values of the last Shaker families in America.


Nonfiction: The Bizarre Lives of Rome’s Emperors

Barry Strauss’s “Ten Caesars” is a quick romp through the strange lives of several Roman rulers.


Nonfiction: When America’s Love of the Open Frontier Hit a Wall

In “The End of the Myth” Greg Grandin explores our love of the boundless West as it evolved over the 19th century and into the 20th — and why it was a mirage.


Fiction: In Two New Novels, the Trouble Is Academic — and All Too Real

“Still in Love” and “Such Good Work” revisit the lessons and trials of the classroom.


Children’s Books: Picture Book Biographies of Women Who Made History

For Women’s History Month — and all year long — these chronicles of the lives of Pura Belpré, Wilma Mankiller, Leonora Carrington and Anna Atkins are needed reminders of women’s achievements.


Fiction: A 1970s Japanese Novel Leading the Way to Ferrante

Written four decades ago, Yuko Tsushima’s novel “Territory of Light” tells of a woman in Tokyo coping with the dissolution of her marriage.


New in Paperback: ‘See What Can Be Done,’ ‘The Gunners’

Six new paperbacks to check out this week.


The Shortlist: Group Biographies Give Trailblazing Historical Women Their Due

From George Eliot and Mary Shelley to Joan of Arc and Coco Chanel, female icons from centuries past take the spotlight in three new books.

 

Books of The Times: A Poet Remembers Her Impulsive Trip Into a Civil War

In her new memoir, Carolyn Forché tells the story of how a stranger’s suggestion that she visit El Salvador in the late 1970s changed the course of her art and her life.


Fiction: A Cosmic Being Dies in Yoga Class. Then Things Get Really Weird.

Kathryn Davis’s novel “The Silk Road” is full of provocative mysteries: Are its characters many or one? Where are they going? Have they witnessed a murder?


Books of The Times: A Writer Gets Candid About Marriage and Humiliation in ‘The Trouble With Men’

David Shields describes his new book as “a short, intensive immersion into the perils, limits and possibilities of human intimacy.”


Books of The Times: ‘Lot’ Offers a Fictional Look at a Vibrant, Polyglot American City

Bryan Washington’s first collection of stories revolve around characters in Houston, particularly one teenage boy discovering his sexuality.


At a Rare Book Fair, the Prices Are Steep but the Lore Is Free

A tour of the recent annual installment of the New York International Antiquarian Book Fair.


Nonfiction: An Intimate Portrait of Sandra Day O’Connor, First Woman on the Supreme Court

“First: Sandra Day O’Connor,” by Evan Thomas, is a richly detailed life of the pathbreaking justice.


The Book Review Podcast: Isaac Mizrahi on His New Memoir

The fashion designer discusses “I.M.,” and David McCraw talks about “Truth in Our Times.”


A Comic Book Publisher Creates Its Own Origin Story

A new publisher, AWA, will have a connected superhero universe as well as stand-alone comics.


Fiction: An Arab-American Poet Asks What It Means to Belong to Two Cultures, or None

In her debut collection, “Invasive Species,” the Egyptian immigrant Marwa Helal plumbs the complications of nationhood and inclusion.


At War: Why Tim O’Brien Agreed to Write for ‘This Is Us’

The acclaimed author of “The Things They Carried” talked to The Times about writing for Season 3 and how an all-volunteer military force changed the public’s perception of war.


Nonfiction: A Memoir of Black Life in the ‘Other America’

In “Survival Math,” Mitchell S. Jackson tells his family story of living in Oregon and reckons with the interplay of racism and patriarchy in his own life.


Rachel Ingalls, 78, Rediscovered Author of ‘Mrs. Caliban,’ Dies

Her 1982 tale of a lonely woman who falls in love with a sea creature had a revival, dovetailing with the release of the 2017 film “The Shape of Water.”


What I Love: A Cliché Harlan Coben Couldn’t Resist

For the best-selling author of thrillers, buying a spooky old Victorian seemed a little too on the nose. But he did it anyway.


Nonfiction: The Complex Literary Friendship Between Langston Hughes and Zora Neale Hurston

In “Zora and Langston,” Yuval Taylor revisits the relationship that laid much of the groundwork for black American literature in the 20th century.


New & Noteworthy

A selection of books published this week; plus, a peek at what our colleagues around the newsroom are reading.


Front Burner: Savory, Sweet and Everything In-Between

A new book gives an alphabetical rundown, with recipes, of the foods most beloved by Jewish-Americans.


Theranos and Elizabeth Holmes: What to Read, Watch and Listen To

Alex Gibney’s new HBO documentary “The Inventor” is only the latest retelling of the Silicon Valley fraud that captivated the public imagination.


Fiction: A Road-Paving Job Takes On a Sinister Allure in Dave Eggers’s New Novel

The author’s eighth novel, “The Parade,” is a parable-like story featuring two unnamed men on assignment in an unnamed country in the wake of a civil war.


The Best Cookbooks for Kids

Books that will inspire children to get into the kitchen and cook.


Carefully Smash the Patriarchy

Carol Gilligan, author of the feminist classic “In a Different Voice,” reminds us that we’re all humans.


Nonfiction: The ‘Enigma’ Who Is the Chief Justice of the United States

Joan Biskupic’s “The Chief” examines John Roberts’s life and his career on the Supreme Court.


The Week in Books

New books from Helen Oyeyemi, Isaac Mizrahi and more.


Marjorie Weinman Sharmat, 90, ‘Nate the Great’ Author, Dies

Her detective hero, who loved pancakes and his dog, Sludge, helped children learn how to read — and how to sleuth.


Edith Iglauer, Journalist and Bard of Canada, Dies at 101

Ms. Iglauer, an American, came to Canada to portray it for the rest of the world. But she made it her home and wrote with an insider’s perspective.


W.S. Merwin, Poet of Life’s Damnable Evanescence, Dies at 91

Mr. Merwin, one of the world’s most decorated poets, sang of silence and nature with an oracular voice. Later in life he became an ardent conservationist.