Nonfiction: The True-Crime Story That Harper Lee Tried and Failed to Write

In “Furious Hours,” Casey Cep investigates the Alabama murder case that was to have been the focus of Lee’s second book — as well as the famously reclusive writer herself, plumbing the mystery of her 50-year silence.


Herman Wouk Wrote Historical Novels. But His True Subject Was Moral Weakness.

In his two World War II novels of the 1970s, Wouk — who died this week — brought psychological insight to genocide, its perpetrators and bystanders. Adelle Waldman explains.


Nonfiction: The World According to John Waters, as Interpreted by Alan Cumming

The septuagenarian filmmaker’s latest collection of essays, “Mr. Know-It-All,” is just what its subtitle promises: “The Tarnished Wisdom of a Filth Elder.”


Nonfiction: Justice John Paul Stevens Looks Back on His Long Career

Stevens’s “The Making of a Justice” is both a personal memoir and a meditation on the law.


Nonfiction: We Have Abundant Food. Why Is Our Health — and the Planet’s — So Bad?

Bee Wilson’s “The Way We Eat Now” delves into the startling consequences of the globalization that has revolutionized our relationship to food.


Editors’ Choice: 10 New Books We Recommend This Week

Suggested reading from critics and editors at The New York Times.


The Book Review Podcast: Harper Lee’s Unwritten True-Crime Book

Casey Cep discusses “Furious Hours,” and Eliza Griswold talks about “Amity and Prosperity: One Family and the Fracturing of America.”


Audiobooks: Colin Farrell Joins the League of High-Profile Narrators of ‘A Portrait of the Artist’

The actor brings a new, restrained lilt to James Joyce’s 1916 classic.


Nonfiction: Grieving the Death of a Child in ‘Once More We Saw Stars’

Jayson Greene’s book is an emotional and loving tribute to his toddler daughter, Greta, killed by a falling brick in New York City in 2015.


Nonfiction: Richard Holbrooke, the Last Great Freewheeling Diplomat

George Packer’s biography of Holbrooke, “Our Man,” is a complex portrait of a complex man who had power, but never enough.


Nonfiction: How Was Polynesia Populated? Two New Books Explore the Pacific’s Mysteries

Christina Thompson’s “Sea People” tells the story of the people of Polynesia and their “discovery,” while Peter Moore’s “Endeavour” looks at the ship that made that encounter possible.


Fiction: A Debut Novel Set on the Brooding, Remote Kamchatka Peninsula

Julia Phillips’s “Disappearing Earth” explores the lives of interconnected women in far eastern Russia after a horrific crime.


Fiction: An American Pilot, a Muslim Teenager and a Talking Dog All Caught in an Absurd War

“Red Birds,” a new novel by the Pakistani author Mohammed Hanif, satirizes America’s never-ending military conflicts in the Middle East.


Nonfiction: The First Presidential Impeachment

Brenda Wineapple’s “The Impeachers” is a revealing history of the trial of Andrew Johnson in 1868.


Nonfiction: Singing the Praises of ‘Big Business’

Tyler Cowen’s new book delivers a “love letter” to capitalism, a system he argues is better than all the rest.


Fiction: Here Come the Brides: A Free-Spirited Fictional Wedding

Leah Hager Cohen’s novel “Strangers and Cousins” uses a vibrant, anarchic family wedding to explore the way change can be both celebrated and feared.


Knopf Fires High-Profile Editor Over Policy Breach

The publishing house dismissed Gary Fisketjon, a longtime editor who worked with such literary stars as Raymond Carver, Annie Dillard and Cormac McCarthy.


Nonfiction: What to Do When You’re a Country in Crisis

In “Upheaval,” Jared Diamond asks whether countries can draw lessons from how individuals confront personal difficulties.


New in Paperback: ‘Florida,’ ‘Robin’

Six new paperbacks to check out this week.


New & Noteworthy Visual Books, From the Grand Canyon to the Moon

A selection of recent visual books; plus, a peek at what our colleagues around the newsroom are reading.


Letters to the Editor: Was Varian Fry Gay — and Should It Matter? Readers Respond

The son of Varian Fry, and several others, weigh in on Cynthia Ozick’s review of Julie Orringer’s novel “The Flight Portfolio.”


Fiction: Love at First Sight and Other Disasters: Stories From Karen Russell

In “Orange World,” surrealism is grounded in the real anxieties of our age.


Inside the List: Did Harper Lee, Who Died in 2016, Leave Behind a True-Crime Manuscript?

That’s what Casey Cep tries to figure out in “Furious Hours,” which enters the nonfiction best-seller list this week at No. 6.


Nonfiction: A Filipino-American Memoir of Racism, Abuse and Heartbreak

Grace Talusan’s “The Body Papers” traces the harrowing challenges she’s faced in both the public and private spheres.


Fiction: ‘The Ash Family’ Is a Debut Novel for Our Climate-Anxious Age

In Molly Dektar’s debut, a young woman falls in with a cult of eco-terrorists.

 

Herman Wouk, Perennially Best-Selling Author, Dies at 103

His critics could be brutal, but he enthralled millions of readers with novels like “The Winds of War,” “The Caine Mutiny” and “Marjorie Morningstar.”


Book Clubs Get Especially Clubby

Every age begets its era-specific book clubs. Perhaps it’s unsurprising that ours features more and more niche, insider gatherings. One for Political Junkies? Check. Thriller writers? Check. Proust lovers? Check.


Knopf Fires High-Profile Editor Over Policy Breach

The publishing house dismissed Gary Fisketjon, a longtime editor who worked with such literary stars as Raymond Carver, Annie Dillard and Cormac McCarthy.


Nonfiction: The Art Market Is Exploding. Meet the Dealers Who Lit the Fuse.

A dishy look at the art world’s most powerful gallerists — including Larry Gagosian and David Zwirner — “Boom,” by Michael Shnayerson, recounts how artworks became multimillion-dollar commodities.


Nonfiction: The World According to John Waters, as Interpreted by Alan Cumming

The septuagenarian filmmaker’s latest collection of essays, “Mr. Know-It-All,” is just what its subtitle promises: “The Tarnished Wisdom of a Filth Elder.”


Nonfiction: Grieving the Death of a Child in ‘Once More We Saw Stars’

Jayson Greene’s book is an emotional and loving tribute to his toddler daughter, Greta, killed by a falling brick in New York City in 2015.


The Book Review Podcast: Harper Lee’s Unwritten True-Crime Book

Casey Cep discusses “Furious Hours,” and Eliza Griswold talks about “Amity and Prosperity: One Family and the Fracturing of America.”


Hannibal Lecter’s Creator Cooks Up Something New (No Fava Beans or Chianti)

The “Silence of the Lambs” author Thomas Harris, overshadowed by the cannibal he invented, has kept a low profile for over 40 years.


Fiction: An American Pilot, a Muslim Teenager and a Talking Dog All Caught in an Absurd War

“Red Birds,” a new novel by the Pakistani author Mohammed Hanif, satirizes America’s never-ending military conflicts in the Middle East.


Nonfiction: The First Presidential Impeachment

Brenda Wineapple’s “The Impeachers” is a revealing history of the trial of Andrew Johnson in 1868.


Nonfiction: Singing the Praises of ‘Big Business’

Tyler Cowen’s new book delivers a “love letter” to capitalism, a system he argues is better than all the rest.


Fiction: Here Come the Brides: A Free-Spirited Fictional Wedding

Leah Hager Cohen’s novel “Strangers and Cousins” uses a vibrant, anarchic family wedding to explore the way change can be both celebrated and feared.


Herman Wouk Wrote Historical Novels. But His True Subject Was Moral Weakness.

In his two World War II novels of the 1970s, Wouk — who died this week — brought psychological insight to genocide, its perpetrators and bystanders. Adelle Waldman explains.


Book Entry: Review: ‘Power Trip’ Ably Guides Us Through the History of Energy

Michael E. Webber’s new book examines humanity’s relationship to energy over time and how each transition affected not just what we produce but how we live.


Nonfiction: What to Do When You’re a Country in Crisis

In “Upheaval,” Jared Diamond asks whether countries can draw lessons from how individuals confront personal difficulties.


New in Paperback: ‘Florida,’ ‘Robin’

Six new paperbacks to check out this week.


New & Noteworthy Visual Books, From the Grand Canyon to the Moon

A selection of recent visual books; plus, a peek at what our colleagues around the newsroom are reading.


Letters to the Editor: Was Varian Fry Gay — and Should It Matter? Readers Respond

The son of Varian Fry, and several others, weigh in on Cynthia Ozick’s review of Julie Orringer’s novel “The Flight Portfolio.”


Fiction: Love at First Sight and Other Disasters: Stories From Karen Russell

In “Orange World,” surrealism is grounded in the real anxieties of our age.


Inside the List: Did Harper Lee, Who Died in 2016, Leave Behind a True-Crime Manuscript?

That’s what Casey Cep tries to figure out in “Furious Hours,” which enters the nonfiction best-seller list this week at No. 6.


Nonfiction: A Filipino-American Memoir of Racism, Abuse and Heartbreak

Grace Talusan’s “The Body Papers” traces the harrowing challenges she’s faced in both the public and private spheres.


Fiction: ‘The Ash Family’ Is a Debut Novel for Our Climate-Anxious Age

In Molly Dektar’s debut, a young woman falls in with a cult of eco-terrorists.


Children’s Books: Bringing Favorite Fairy Tales Up to Date

These new takes on beloved old stories deliver empowered princesses and racial diversity while staying true to the genre’s stark, dangerous heart.


The Shortlist: Family Memoirs: The Ties That Bind and Those That Fray

Four reminiscences of mothers and fathers, brothers and sisters, from farming communities in California and South Dakota to the suburbs of New York.


Editors’ Choice: 10 New Books We Recommend This Week

Suggested reading from critics and editors at The New York Times.