What Reconstruction-Era Laws Can Teach Our Democracy

“The Second Founding,” by the historian Eric Foner, argues that the radical promise of the 13th, 14th and 15th Amendments — all passed after the Civil War — remains unfulfilled today.


Leslie Jamison on the Best Book She Ever Got as a Present

The author, whose new essay collection is “Make It Scream, Make It Burn,” says that a boyfriend gave her a “Choose Your Own Adventure” novel with a secret message inside. “I don’t think I fully appreciated this gesture at the time; now I do!”


Rachel Cusk Said She Was Done With Autobiography. These Essays Suggest Otherwise.

In “Coventry,” the British author of the widely admired “Outline” trilogy shows how central the self is to her artistic vision.


She Escaped From Nxivm. Now She’s Written a Book About the Sex Cult.

In “Scarred,” Sarah Edmondson — once a high-ranking Nxivm member — describes her years in the group.


More and More Children Are Feeling Anxious. This Graphic Novelist Is Trying to Help.

“Guts,” Raina Telgemeier’s warm, funny and realistic new graphic memoir, hits home for parents and children trying to climb out of the abyss of worry.


A Dazzling, Sweetly Aching New Novel From Jacqueline Woodson

In “Red at the Bone,” the effects of an unplanned teenage pregnancy ripple through three generations of a Brooklyn family.


10 New Books We Recommend This Week

Suggested reading from critics and editors at The New York Times.


Bringing Down Harvey Weinstein

Jodi Kantor and Megan Twohey talk about their new book, “She Said,” and Ian Urbina discusses “The Outlaw Ocean.”


‘The Institute’ Might Be Stephen King’s Scariest Novel Yet

The terror doesn’t come from ghosts or fiends or clowns — it’s ordinary people, folks just like you and me, who are the evil ones.


From the Country’s New Poet Laureate, Poems Reclaiming Tribal Culture

In “An American Sunrise,” Joy Harjo draws on her Muscogee Creek heritage to celebrate indigenous traditions and to mourn their passing.


Haitians May Leave Their Country, but It Never Leaves Them

For the characters in Edwidge Danticat’s new story collection, “Everything Inside,” the pull of their native land is as complex as it is strong.


Pirates, Slavers and Poachers: Violence on the High Seas

“The Outlaw Ocean,” the journalist Ian Urbina’s chronicle of offshore crime, ranges from Somalia to the Philippines to the Antarctic.


While You’re Waiting for the Next Hilary Mantel, Try Andrew Miller

Miller’s latest historical novel, “Now We Shall Be Entirely Free,” plunges readers deep into the 18th-century England of the Peninsular War.


Two Times Reporters on ‘The Education of Brett Kavanaugh’

Robin Pogrebin and Kate Kelly discuss their new book, and Tim Winton talks about his most recent novel, “The Shepherd’s Hut.”


New Y.A. Crossover From Morgan Parker, Renée Ahdieh and More

“Who Put This Song On?,” “The Beautiful,” “Juliet Takes a Breath” and “American Royals” show many ways to survive the wrenching journey to adulthood.


When Lesbian Publishing Made It Big

A graphic tribute to the landmark Naiad Press.


Considering Margaret Atwood and Uneasy Sisterhood

In Margaret Atwood’s 1993 novel “The Robber Bride,” three women encounter the glamorous and destructive college friend they thought had died five years earlier. Lorrie Moore reviewed it.


New in Paperback: ‘Looking for Lorraine’ and ‘Evolution’

Six new paperbacks to check out this week.


‘Something I’m Always Trying to Do Is Get You to Hang Out With Dead Bodies’

Caitlin Doughty, the mortician, self-described death activist and “funeral industry rabble-rouser,” has a new book, “Will My Cat Eat My Eyeballs?”


11 New Books We Recommend This Week

Suggested reading from critics and editors at The New York Times.


One Part Gangster, One Part Philosophical Clown

“Night Boat to Tangier,” by Kevin Barry, features two battered old Irish drug smugglers right out of Beckett.


A Death-Haunted Poetry Book Mulls Life’s Reversals of Fortune

“Dunce,” by Mary Ruefle, confronts the extraordinary yet inescapable fact that all of us die.


A Translator’s Tribute to the Lifesaving Power of Words

In her evocative memoir, “Homesick,” Jennifer Croft recalls, in words and images, her troubled childhood and the solace she found in language.


Meat Is Murder. But You Know That Already.

In his new essay collection, “We Are the Weather,” Jonathan Safran Foer turns his attention to the climate crisis. Mark Bittman weighs in.


Confronting Grief, Mental Illness and Marginalization, in Verse

Four poetry collections — “Be Recorder,” by Carmen Giménez Smith; “Odes to Lithium,” by Shira Erlichman; “Grief Sequence,” by Prageeta Sharma; and “Eyes Bottle Dark With a Mouthful of Flowers,” by Jake Skeets — explore narratives of belonging and identity.

 

In ‘The Water Dancer,’ Ta-Nehisi Coates’s Debut Novel, a Slave Tries to Control His Special Powers

Coates’s first novel, about a 19th-century man who has the ability to vanish from one place and appear in another, has echoes of work by Gabriel García Márquez, Colson Whitehead and Stephen King.


Colson Whitehead, Marlon James in Running for National Book Awards

Whitehead, who won in 2016, was nominated this year for “The Nickel Boys,” one of 10 novels longlisted.


Arabic Readers in Israel Have to Hope the Border Guards Are Sloppy

Books by famed Arab authors, and Arabic translations of writers like Orwell and Joyce, are scarce because of an Israeli ban on imports from Lebanon, Syria and Iraq.


Read It Before You See It

With “Little Women,” “Watchmen” and other book adaptations heading to screens big and small, here are nine titles worth curling up with first.


Ann Patchett Will Eventually Discuss Her Book

“The Dutch House,” a novel whose creation she compared to burning a cake, is coming out soon. Let’s change the subject.


More and More Children Are Feeling Anxious. This Graphic Novelist Is Trying to Help.

“Guts,” Raina Telgemeier’s warm, funny and realistic new graphic memoir, hits home for parents and children trying to climb out of the abyss of worry.


Two Times Reporters on ‘The Education of Brett Kavanaugh’

Robin Pogrebin and Kate Kelly discuss their new book, and Tim Winton talks about his most recent novel, “The Shepherd’s Hut.”


New Y.A. Crossover From Morgan Parker, Renée Ahdieh and More

“Who Put This Song On?,” “The Beautiful,” “Juliet Takes a Breath” and “American Royals” show many ways to survive the wrenching journey to adulthood.


Annette Kolodny, Feminist Critic and Scholar, Dies at 78

She was a pioneer in the field of ecofeminism, in which she drew parallels between the ravaging of the environment and the ravaging of women.


When Lesbian Publishing Made It Big

A graphic tribute to the landmark Naiad Press.


Considering Margaret Atwood and Uneasy Sisterhood

In Margaret Atwood’s 1993 novel “The Robber Bride,” three women encounter the glamorous and destructive college friend they thought had died five years earlier. Lorrie Moore reviewed it.


New in Paperback: ‘Looking for Lorraine’ and ‘Evolution’

Six new paperbacks to check out this week.


‘Something I’m Always Trying to Do Is Get You to Hang Out With Dead Bodies’

Caitlin Doughty, the mortician, self-described death activist and “funeral industry rabble-rouser,” has a new book, “Will My Cat Eat My Eyeballs?”


The Violence That Followed Iraq’s Post-Invasion Spiral

James Verini is out with “They Will Have to Die Now,” a book about the battle of Mosul and its consequences.


Look to the Skies to See the Bat-Signal in Cities Worldwide

In a celebration of Batman started by DC Comics, sites including the former Domino Sugar building in Brooklyn will be emblazoned with his symbol on Saturday.


Steve Dalachinsky, Avant-Garde Poet, Is Dead at 72

A familiar sight in downtown New York clubs as both a spectator and a performer, he often read his poems to jazz accompaniment.


When Dictionaries Wade Into the Gender (Non)Binary

Merriam-Webster announced an additional definition for “they”: a third-person, singular pronoun for nonbinary people. And Oxford has been criticized for its entry under “woman.”


11 New Books We Recommend This Week

Suggested reading from critics and editors at The New York Times.


Milton’s Shakespeare Was Just a Trans-Atlantic Tweet Away

A scholar in England suspected annotations in a First Folio at the Free Library of Philadelphia were John Milton’s, so he connected the dots with someone who had studied the work for a decade.


One Part Gangster, One Part Philosophical Clown

“Night Boat to Tangier,” by Kevin Barry, features two battered old Irish drug smugglers right out of Beckett.


Ady Barkan Won’t Let Dying Stop His Activism

Democratic presidential candidates are flocking to California to meet Mr. Barkan, who is dying of A.L.S. But the sicker he gets, the more famous he becomes.


This Season’s Most Anticipated Books, With Just a Few Spoilers

The artist Katja Seib illustrates what happens inside fall’s novels (and one poetry collection). Plus, a few other releases on our radar.


Rock Star Patti Smith, Making Paris Swoon

She is working toward a third act as a novelist, and her new book, “Year of the Monkey,” blends fact and fiction.


Leslie Jamison on the Best Book She Ever Got as a Present

The author, whose new essay collection is “Make It Scream, Make It Burn,” says that a boyfriend gave her a “Choose Your Own Adventure” novel with a secret message inside. “I don’t think I fully appreciated this gesture at the time; now I do!”


Jacqueline Woodson Transformed Children’s Literature. Now She’s Writing for Herself.

The award-winning author on her mission to diversify publishing — and why she turned back to adult readers with her new novel, “Red at the Bone.”