Who Is the Dalai Lama?

An expert explores the life of the man Tibetans call ‘Wish-Fulfilling Jewel.’


‘Facebook: The Inside Story’ Offers a Front-Row Seat on Voracious Ambition

For his new book, the veteran technology reporter Steven Levy gained abundant access to Mark Zuckerberg and firsthand knowledge of his quest for power.


For Lily King, a Great Book Always Starts With the Sentences

“You can’t make a good spaghetti sauce with rotten tomatoes.”


An Oil Boom, a Missing Body and a Native Woman’s Quest to Find It

“Yellow Bird,” by Sierra Crane Murdoch, paints a gripping portrait of life on Fort Berthold Reservation, through the eyes of a local woman determined to solve a murder.


Ross Douthat Has a Vision of America. It’s Grim.

In “The Decadent Society” Douthat argues that cultural exhaustion and world-weariness are sapping the strength of the United States.


This Novel Is Set in a ’90s M.F.A. Program. The Author Is Aware of Your Concerns.

In Teddy Wayne’s new novel, “Apartment,” tensions rise between two Manhattan roommates who aspire to the literati.


Unjust America

Adam Cohen talks about “Supreme Inequality,” and Madeline Levine discusses “Ready or Not.”


11 New Books We Recommend This Week

Suggested reading from critics and editors at The New York Times.


Colum McCann Gives Voice to Grieving Fathers, One Israeli and One Palestinian

In his new novel, “Apeirogon,” McCann tells the real-life story of two men whose daughters died in the Middle East conflict.


A Supreme Court for the Rich

Adam Cohen’s “Supreme Inequality” shows that for 50 years the decisions of the Supreme Court have favored the wealthy.


Affirmative Action: The Uniquely American Experiment

In “The Affirmative Action Puzzle,” Melvin I. Urofsky looks at over a century of efforts to combat racial injustice in America.


She Found Carson McCullers’s Love Letters. They Taught Her Something About Herself.

In “My Autobiography of Carson McCullers,” Jenn Shapland describes how studying the novelist, who died in 1967, helped her reckon with her own identity.


Starring Diane Keaton as Herself

In her new memoir, “Brother & Sister,” the actor opens up about her family.


Think You Know George Washington?

Alexis Coe’s biography gives a fresh perspective on a much-mythologized man.


She Took Her First Pill at 8. By 13, She Was an Addict.

Erin Khar’s memoir, “Strung Out,” brings a new lens to the opioid crisis.


Crashing Henry VIII’s Court One Last Time With Hilary Mantel

“The Mirror and the Light” concludes Mantel’s “Wolf Hall” trilogy with another Tudor panoply viewed entirely through the eyes of Thomas Cromwell.


Can Cities Save America?

In “The Nation City,” Rahm Emanuel argues that we have to shift our focus away from Washington and toward urban centers.


How Churchill Brought Britain Back From the Brink

Erik Larson’s “The Splendid and the Vile” is a tale of courage, suffering and defiance during the London Blitz.


New & Noteworthy, From Suffrage to Sexism

A selection of recent books of interest; plus, a peek at what our colleagues around the newsroom are reading.


Why Did an Accomplished Writer Fall Silent for Two Decades?

Elizabeth Tallent’s memoir, “Scratched,” offers some answers.


A Real-Life J.F.K. Lover, Murdered in 1964, Stars in Two New Novels

“The Lost Diary of M” and “JFK and Mary Meyer” are both fictional diaries of the A-list Washington socialite Mary Pinchot Meyer.


It’s Time to Unfriend the Internet

In “Lurking,” Joanne McNeil examines what it means to be a person online.


It’s 2038. The World Is Dust and Forests Are Scarce.

Welcome to “Greenwood,” Michael Christie’s time-hopping, globe-circling novel with apocalyptic themes.


Reviving Emily Dickinson in 10 Episodes

In “These Fevered Days,” Martha Ackmann plumbs pivotal moments in the poet’s life for fresh insight into her mind.


A Widow Takes Her Grown Kids on a Cruise. What Could Go Wrong?

Amanda Eyre Ward’s new novel, “The Jetsetters,” follows a dysfunctional family out to sea.

 

13 New Books to Watch For in March

The latest from James McBride and Hilary Mantel, a follow-up to “Capital in the Twenty-First Century,” a timely call to abolish the Electoral College and more.


Katie Roiphe Feels Ambivalent About Feeling Ambivalent

“The Power Notebooks,” Roiphe says, is an attempt to write about the “confusion” and “self-contempt” that she normally tries to hold at bay.


For Hilary Mantel, There’s No Time Like the Past

“Wolf Hall” and “Bring Up the Bodies,” the first books in her Thomas Cromwell trilogy, have sold millions. Now the two-time Booker Prize winner is finishing the job with “The Mirror and the Light.”


‘Temporary’ Is a Debut Novel That Leans Into the Absurdity of How We Work Now

Hilary Leichter’s brisk, wildly imaginative book tracks a young woman’s experiences in 23 jobs, including one on a pirate ship.


Ross Douthat Has a Vision of America. It’s Grim.

In “The Decadent Society” Douthat argues that cultural exhaustion and world-weariness are sapping the strength of the United States.


Can Cities Save America?

In “The Nation City,” Rahm Emanuel argues that we have to shift our focus away from Washington and toward urban centers.


Unjust America

Adam Cohen talks about “Supreme Inequality,” and Madeline Levine discusses “Ready or Not.”


Linda Wolfe, 87, Dies; Wrote of ‘Preppie Murder’ and Other Crimes

She probed the psychology of mostly upper-class perpetrators, saying their personal histories interested her more than the crimes themselves.


Brooklyn Public Library and Brooklyn Historical Society to Merge

A new plan will combine their rich archival holdings, officials say, while preserving the missions of both institutions.


Which Art Fair Is for You? Let Our Critic Be Your Guide

One of New York’s busiest art fair seasons kicks off this week with the Art Show at the Park Avenue Armory. Nine sprawling exhibitions will follow next week. Here’s our critic’s guide.


11 New Books We Recommend This Week

Suggested reading from critics and editors at The New York Times.


Poem: Entanglement

A microscopic gaze into the mysteries of relationships.


Think You Know George Washington?

Alexis Coe’s biography gives a fresh perspective on a much-mythologized man.


For Lily King, a Great Book Always Starts With the Sentences

“You can’t make a good spaghetti sauce with rotten tomatoes.”


‘To Kill a Mockingbird’ Meets an Arena Full of Students

Madison Square Garden opened its doors for the first time to a Broadway play, as well as to thousands of students from across the city. There were a few logistical hurdles.


Clive Cussler, Best-Selling Author and Adventurer, Is Dead at 88

His literary fantasies and larger-than-life exploits swirled together for decades. He wrote 85 books, selling no fewer than 100 million copies, and located scores of shipwrecks.


Katie Hill, Who Quit Congress Amid Ethics Inquiry, Will Publish Memoir

Last fall, private photos were published of Ms. Hill, and the House investigated claims of a relationship with an aide. Her farewell speech became famous.


She Took Her First Pill at 8. By 13, She Was an Addict.

Erin Khar’s memoir, “Strung Out,” brings a new lens to the opioid crisis.


Crashing Henry VIII’s Court One Last Time With Hilary Mantel

“The Mirror and the Light” concludes Mantel’s “Wolf Hall” trilogy with another Tudor panoply viewed entirely through the eyes of Thomas Cromwell.


Who Is the Dalai Lama?

An expert explores the life of the man Tibetans call ‘Wish-Fulfilling Jewel.’


How Churchill Brought Britain Back From the Brink

Erik Larson’s “The Splendid and the Vile” is a tale of courage, suffering and defiance during the London Blitz.


New & Noteworthy, From Suffrage to Sexism

A selection of recent books of interest; plus, a peek at what our colleagues around the newsroom are reading.


‘Facebook: The Inside Story’ Offers a Front-Row Seat on Voracious Ambition

For his new book, the veteran technology reporter Steven Levy gained abundant access to Mark Zuckerberg and firsthand knowledge of his quest for power.


An Oil Boom, a Missing Body and a Native Woman’s Quest to Find It

“Yellow Bird,” by Sierra Crane Murdoch, paints a gripping portrait of life on Fort Berthold Reservation, through the eyes of a local woman determined to solve a murder.


Why Did an Accomplished Writer Fall Silent for Two Decades?

Elizabeth Tallent’s memoir, “Scratched,” offers some answers.