In ‘The Nickel Boys,’ Colson Whitehead Depicts a Real-Life House of Horrors

The reform school at the center of Whitehead’s new novel (his first since “The Underground Railroad”) is more like a prison where the inmates are brutalized and even killed.


Finding Mercy in the Wake of the Charleston Massacre

An intimate account of the 2015 hate crime and its aftermath, “Grace Will Lead Us Home,” by Jennifer Berry Hawes, explores how those affected struggled to carry on.


When Leaving a Religion Is Like Abandoning a Cult

Amber Scorah’s memoir, “Leaving the Witness,” recounts a tale of disillusion and ultimate apostasy as she decides to turn away from the faith she’s known since birth.


Teddy Roosevelt and the Rough Riders

Clay Risen’s “The Crowded Hour” describes the campaign that turned a politician into a legend.


Chuck Klosterman Likes Writers Who Aren’t Self-Absorbed Sociopaths

The cultural critic and author, most recently, of the story collection “Raised in Captivity” also says that he trusts librarians’ literary opinions: “They have no agenda and plenty of free time.”


What Children Remember From the War

Svetlana Alexievich’s newly translated oral history, “Last Witnesses,” presents the recollections of Russians who experienced World War II as children.


11 New Books We Recommend This Week

Suggested reading from critics and editors at The New York Times.


George F. Will on Conservatism’s Homelessness

Will discusses “The Conservative Sensibility,” and David Maraniss talks about “A Good American Family: The Red Scare and My Father.”


The Life Cycle of a Beach Read

The cover is clean and brand-new, the pages are crisp — and then your vacation begins. Jessica Olien illustrates the path to the dog-eared and waterlogged.


Text on the Beach: Great Summer Reads

Beach books are the cool aunts of the literary world: They drive with the top down and take you to new places. They’re memorable, challenging, warm and wise.


Justice John Paul Stevens Had Some Things to Say Before He Died

Stevens’s “The Making of a Justice” is both a personal memoir and a meditation on the law.


A Son’s Memoir of His Father’s Radical Beliefs, Pursuit by the F.B.I. and Ardent Love for America

“A Good American Family,” by David Maraniss, examines the paranoia and brutality of the McCarthy era through the lens of his father’s experience.


The Soviet Union’s Jewish Tolstoy — Censored in Life, Now Revived

Alexandra Popoff has written a biography of Vasily Grossman, the Soviet writer whose masterpiece, “Life and Fate,” compared Stalin’s regime to Hitler’s.


Colson Whitehead Talks About ‘The Nickel Boys’

The Pulitzer Prize winner discusses his new novel, and Jon Gertner talks about “The Ice at the End of the World.”


New & Noteworthy Visual Books, From Maurice Sendak’s Stage Sets to Dogs in Space

A selection of recent visual books of interest; plus, a peek at what our colleagues around the newsroom are reading.


Why Have Novels About Royalty Stormed the Y.A. Best-Seller Lists?

Ruthless and treacherous, the characters in these books may be kings, queens and pawns, but they act a lot like the people at a teenager’s lunch table.


New in Paperback: ‘The Price You Pay,’ ‘No Good Alternative’

Six new paperbacks to check out this week.


A Recipe for ‘Heartburn’

The cartoonist Will McPhail works through his feelings about Nora Ephron’s classic divorce book by baking a pie.


Jo Nesbo, Master of Norway Noir, Returns With His Creepiest Yet

Nesbo’s new novel, “The Knife,” made Marilyn Stasio’s skin crawl, so she followed it with less grisly fare, including a mystery set at a summer cottage in Maine.


The Literary Battle of the Sexes, 1907-Style

That year seems to have been a turning point: For the first time, books by women sold as well — or better than — books by men.


Stephen King Reviews Laura Lippman’s New Novel, ‘Lady in the Lake’

An intrepid newspaper reporter — juggling work, desire, ambition and family — investigates two murders in mid-1960s Baltimore.


The Kids Are Not All Right

In these three summer thrillers — by Ruth Ware, Adrian McKinty and Alex North — children are in peril.


Readers Add to the List of Best Memoirs Since 1969

Responses to a recent issue of the Sunday Book Review.


In This Novel, a Black South African Becomes a Domestic Worker — in Her Son’s Home

Bianca Marais’s “If You Want to Make God Laugh” shines a light on the racial inequalities of the post-apartheid era.


A Novel Based on the Life of Peggy Guggenheim

Courtney Maum’s “Costalegre” is narrated by the 15-year-old daughter of an American art collector, and set in the Mexican jungle.

 

In Praise of Wright Morris

Peter Orner, author of “Maggie Brown & Others,” on a writer who specializes in “American oddness.”


Stephen King Reviews Laura Lippman’s New Novel, ‘Lady in the Lake’

An intrepid newspaper reporter — juggling work, desire, ambition and family — investigates two murders in mid-1960s Baltimore.


Jo Nesbo, Master of Norway Noir, Returns With His Creepiest Yet

Nesbo’s new novel, “The Knife,” made Marilyn Stasio’s skin crawl, so she followed it with less grisly fare, including a mystery set at a summer cottage in Maine.


Chuck Klosterman Likes Writers Who Aren’t Self-Absorbed Sociopaths

The cultural critic and author, most recently, of the story collection “Raised in Captivity” also says that he trusts librarians’ literary opinions: “They have no agenda and plenty of free time.”


Readers Add to the List of Best Memoirs Since 1969

Responses to a recent issue of the Sunday Book Review.


Colson Whitehead Talks About ‘The Nickel Boys’

The Pulitzer Prize winner discusses his new novel, and Jon Gertner talks about “The Ice at the End of the World.”


The Week in Books

Colson Whitehead’s “The Nickel Boys,” Jo Nesbo’s latest thriller and more.


‘Tired of Running’: A Sci-Fi Veteran Tells His Own (Earthling) Story

In ‘Becoming Superman,’ J. Michael Straczynski chronicles a life that was dominated early on by dysfunction and later by success that came with its own tensions.


New & Noteworthy Visual Books, From Maurice Sendak’s Stage Sets to Dogs in Space

A selection of recent visual books of interest; plus, a peek at what our colleagues around the newsroom are reading.


Why Have Novels About Royalty Stormed the Y.A. Best-Seller Lists?

Ruthless and treacherous, the characters in these books may be kings, queens and pawns, but they act a lot like the people at a teenager’s lunch table.


New in Paperback: ‘The Price You Pay,’ ‘No Good Alternative’

Six new paperbacks to check out this week.


Audre Lorde’s Berlin

Following in the footsteps of the self-described “black feminist lesbian poet,” whose ideas caught fire in a city she cherished and criticized.


A Recipe for ‘Heartburn’

The cartoonist Will McPhail works through his feelings about Nora Ephron’s classic divorce book by baking a pie.


The Literary Battle of the Sexes, 1907-Style

That year seems to have been a turning point: For the first time, books by women sold as well — or better than — books by men.


11 New Books We Recommend This Week

Suggested reading from critics and editors at The New York Times.


Have We Hit Peak Podcast?

If past experience (cough, blogs) is any indication, a shakeout is nigh.


Lucette Lagnado, Memoirist of Jews in Old Cairo, Dies at 62

She and her family, whom she later wrote about, were among the last Jews to flee what she called a “cultural holocaust” and ended up in Brooklyn in the early 1960s.


92nd Street Y to Host Ron Howard, Gwyneth Paltrow and Salman Rushdie

The 2019-20 season also features appearances by André Aciman and Ruth Bader Ginsburg.


What Boris Johnson’s Forgotten Novel Says About the U.K.’s Likely Leader

He’s the author of a farce called “Seventy-Two Virgins,” a Churchill biography and a book in verse about pushy parents. They all say something about his personality.


Andrea Camilleri, Author of Inspector Montalbano Novels, Dies at 93

Mr. Camilleri was a late-blooming novelist whose series about a Sicilian police officer became wildly popular in Italy and the basis for a television series.


The Kids Are Not All Right

In these three summer thrillers — by Ruth Ware, Adrian McKinty and Alex North — children are in peril.


In This Novel, a Black South African Becomes a Domestic Worker — in Her Son’s Home

Bianca Marais’s “If You Want to Make God Laugh” shines a light on the racial inequalities of the post-apartheid era.


Steve Cannon, Whose Townhouse Was an East Village Salon, Dies at 84

A writer and publisher who had lost his sight, he opened his door to a revolving cast of painters, poets, musicians and others for meandering conversation.


A Novel Based on the Life of Peggy Guggenheim

Courtney Maum’s “Costalegre” is narrated by the 15-year-old daughter of an American art collector, and set in the Mexican jungle.


They’re Not as Famous as Lewis and Clark, but They Should Be

David Roberts’s “Escalante’s Dream” retraces the 1,700-mile journey of an expedition led by two Spanish friars in the 18th-century Southwest.