The Enduring Whimsy and Wonderment of Eric Carle

The beloved children’s author and illustrator died in May. But his irrepressible spirit lives on in his books.


A Son of Gabriel García Márquez Tenderly Recalls His Parents

In “A Farewell to Gabo and Mercedes,” Rodrigo Garcia chronicles his parents’ final days, including his celebrated father’s struggle with dementia and his mother’s fierce independence to the end.


What Makes Elon Musk Different

Two new books, Eric Berger’s “Liftoff” and Tim Higgins’s “Power Play,” explore Musk’s terrestrial and extraterrestrial pursuits — and what has made him so successful.


In ‘The Council of Animals,’ the Fate of Humanity Comes Down to a Vote

In Nick McDonell’s new novel, humans are almost extinct. Now the animal kingdom must decide their fate.


Hermione Hoby Takes on Virtue-Signaling

In her new novel, “Virtue,” a white, liberal 20-something is torn between elitism and activism.


A Fresh Look at the Family Who Led (and Lost) Britain’s War for America

“The Howe Dynasty,” by Julie Flavell, adds nuance and complexity to the story of a famous English military family by examining the extensive correspondence of one of its female members.


A Heartbreaking Novel About Mothers, Daughters and Secrets

Elisabeth Egan talks about Esther Freud’s “I Couldn’t Love You More,” and Philip D’Anieri discusses “The Appalachian Trail.”


11 New Books We Recommend This Week

Suggested reading from critics and editors at The New York Times.


Eddie Glaude Jr., an Expert on James Baldwin, Reveals His Favorite Baldwin Book

Glaude, the author of “Begin Again,” says that “No Name in the Street” (1972) “tries to offer an account of what happened between Little Rock, Dr. King’s assassination and the emergence of Black Power. Trauma and wound saturate his sentences, and his memory fails him in places. It is a masterpiece at the level of form and substance.”


Laura Dave Turned the Scorned Wife Into a ‘Hero’

In her best-selling thriller, “The Last Thing He Told Me,” a Silicon Valley wife learns the truth about her missing husband.


Book Review: ‘What Strange Paradise,’ by Omar El Akkad

Omar El Akkad’s new novel follows a young refugee who survives a shipwreck and the girl who comes to his aid.


To Battle Climate Change, Begin With Your Air-Conditioner

In “After Cooling,” Eric Dean Wilson explores the ways that temperature-controlled environments contribute to the climate crisis.


Tracking ‘Strange Beasts of China’ With Booze, Smokes and Sleuthing

Set in a fictional Chinese city, Yan Ge’s novel features a bestiary of mysterious creatures and a cryptozoologist narrator who is trying to study and classify them.


11 New Books We Recommend This Week

Suggested reading from critics and editors at The New York Times.


Everything Old Is New Again and Other Best-Selling Wisdom

A look at this week’s popular novels reminds us that good writing runs in families, wet T-shirts attract attention and you can’t hide from your past.


Graphic Novelists Who Show Us What Loneliness Means

In her latest Graphic Content column, Hillary Chute looks at new books from Kristen Radtke and Lizzy Stewart, as well as a first graphic novel from Anne Carson.


Phillip Lopate Is No Fan of ‘The Catcher in the Rye’

“Holden Caulfield irritated me massively.”


Side by Side With Sondheim: Alan Cumming Reviews a New Book About ‘Sunday in the Park’

In “Putting It Together,” James Lapine recounts how he and Stephen Sondheim created the Pulitzer Prize-winning musical.


New & Noteworthy, From Horse Girls to an E.R. Doctor’s View of Covid

A selection of recent titles of note; plus, a peek at what our colleagues around the newsroom are reading.


Finding the ‘Believers’ Who Will Remake a Damaged Earth

In a travelogue, Lisa Wells searches for communities and individuals committed to healing the damage of climate change.


A New John Oliver Killens Novel Arrives, Three Decades After His Death

Killens’s posthumously released novel, “The Minister Primarily,” is a searing and satirical look at race in America.


Ha Jin Considers the Cost of Freedom in ‘A Song Everlasting’

Jin’s new novel follows a Beijing opera singer who flees to the United States after he gets in trouble with the Chinese state.


New in Paperback: ‘Transcendent Kingdom’ and ‘Agent Sonya’

Six new paperbacks to check out this week.


Make a Splash: 8 Summer Picture Books Take You to the Water

Dip into these picture books about pools and beaches, swimming and sailing, calm waters and stormy seas.

 

Erik Larson Has a Scary Story He’d Like You to Hear

After years writing nonfiction, he is now the author of a made-up tale about ghost-hunting that will only be sold as an audiobook.


Side by Side With Sondheim: Alan Cumming Reviews a New Book About ‘Sunday in the Park’

In “Putting It Together,” James Lapine recounts how he and Stephen Sondheim created the Pulitzer Prize-winning musical.


11 New Books Coming in August

Buzzy new novels from Alexandra Kleeman, Leila Slimani and Stephen King, Billie Jean King’s memoir and plenty more.


This Novel Revisits a Power Broker Who Trod Lightly and Left a Big Footprint

Andrew Haswell Green accomplished a lot in 19th-century New York, but he was an enigma even in his own time. In “The Great Mistake,” Jonathan Lee imagines his way into Green’s mind.


Booker Prize Longlist Is Unveiled

Rachel Cusk’s “Second Place,” Richard Powers’s “Bewilderment” and Kazuo Ishiguro’s “Klara and the Sun” are among the 13 novels nominated for one of the world’s most prestigious literary awards.


A Heartbreaking Novel About Mothers, Daughters and Secrets

Elisabeth Egan talks about Esther Freud’s “I Couldn’t Love You More,” and Philip D’Anieri discusses “The Appalachian Trail.”


Floyd Cooper, Illustrator of Black Life for Children, Dies at 65

He sought to revive and recount chapters of African American history that he felt weren’t taught enough in classrooms.


11 New Books We Recommend This Week

Suggested reading from critics and editors at The New York Times.


Everything Old Is New Again and Other Best-Selling Wisdom

A look at this week’s popular novels reminds us that good writing runs in families, wet T-shirts attract attention and you can’t hide from your past.


Poem: Letter to a Bridge Made of Rope

In this poem, as in life, what is missed is not what matters most, but how we might be awed by what we notice.


Graphic Novelists Who Show Us What Loneliness Means

In her latest Graphic Content column, Hillary Chute looks at new books from Kristen Radtke and Lizzy Stewart, as well as a first graphic novel from Anne Carson.


Phillip Lopate Is No Fan of ‘The Catcher in the Rye’

“Holden Caulfield irritated me massively.”


The Imaginary Summer

Expectation vs. reality.


Onstage, the Pen Is Usually Duller Than the Sword

Plays about writers, including “Mr. Fullerton,” a new potboiler probing Edith Wharton’s love life, too often undermine the real brilliance of their subjects.


New & Noteworthy, From Horse Girls to an E.R. Doctor’s View of Covid

A selection of recent titles of note; plus, a peek at what our colleagues around the newsroom are reading.


Sunday in the Trenches With George

James Lapine’s book shows how he and Stephen Sondheim invested two years of work to burnish their musical from an avant-garde near-disaster to a mainstream classic.


Book Review: ‘Afterparties,’ by Anthony Veasna So

In “Afterparties,” Anthony Veasna So, who died at 28 last year, reimagines California’s Central Valley through the lives of its Cambodian immigrants.


Finding the ‘Believers’ Who Will Remake a Damaged Earth

In a travelogue, Lisa Wells searches for communities and individuals committed to healing the damage of climate change.


What We Learned From Mena Suvari’s Book on the ‘Dark Part’ of Her Life

In her new memoir, the “American Beauty” and “American Pie” actor opens up about years of sexual abuse and drug addiction, as well as an “eerie” moment with Kevin Spacey.


The Mystery of My Obsession With Agatha Christie

People were dying all around me. So why was I escaping into tales of murder?


A New John Oliver Killens Novel Arrives, Three Decades After His Death

Killens’s posthumously released novel, “The Minister Primarily,” is a searing and satirical look at race in America.


Ha Jin Considers the Cost of Freedom in ‘A Song Everlasting’

Jin’s new novel follows a Beijing opera singer who flees to the United States after he gets in trouble with the Chinese state.


Sally Miller Gearhart, Lesbian Separatist and Activist, Dies at 90

She fought anti-gay policies alongside Harvey Milk, wrote influential books, including science fiction, and founded a women-only refuge in the woods.


The Extraordinary History (and Likely Busy Future) of Quarantine

“Until Proven Safe,” by Geoff Manaugh and Nicola Twilley, is about the lifesaving measure that has also been abused for political purposes over the centuries.


The Enduring Whimsy and Wonderment of Eric Carle

The beloved children’s author and illustrator died in May. But his irrepressible spirit lives on in his books.