Book Review: ‘The Dead Are Arising,’ by Les Payne and Tamara Payne

Thirty years in the making, “The Dead Are Arising,” by Les Payne and Tamara Payne, sharpens our understanding of the Black activist and thinker whose influence continues to reverberate.


A Mother Takes Readers on a Journey With Her Autistic Son

Amy S.F. Lutz asks difficult questions in “We Walk.”


Book Review: ‘Missionaries,’ by Phil Klay

Phil Klay’s “Missionaries” follows the lives of four characters involved in the violent, decades-long conflict.


From George Eliot to Neo-Nazi Skinheads: The Chaotic Cult of Richard Wagner

Alex Ross’s “Wagnerism” is “a book about a musician’s influence on non-musicians — resonances and reverberations of one art form into others.” Reviewed by John Adams.


From Concerts to Cartoons: Chopin’s Most Famous Composition

A combination of biography, cultural commentary and personal reflection, Annik LaFarge’s “Chasing Chopin” radiates out from the “Funeral March.”


America’s Refusal to Address the Roots of Violence

Elliott Currie’s “A Peculiar Indifference” traces the history of violence in Black communities and the reasons for it.


The Ottoman Empire’s Influence on the Present Day

Alan Mikhail talks about “God’s Shadow,” and Benjamin Lorr discusses “The Secret Life of Groceries.”


9 New Books We Recommend This Week

Suggested reading from critics and editors at The New York Times.


The Untold Technological Revolution Sweeping Through Rural China

In “Blockchain Chicken Farm,” Xiaowei Wang documents how technology is transforming the lives of China’s rural poor.


Just Like You, Claire Messud Never Read ‘A Brief History of Time’

“I bought it because everyone else did, I guess.”


In Shaping Her Own Story, She Upends a National Epic

Gabriela Cabezón Cámara’s novel “The Adventures of China Iron” spotlights a female character relegated to a bare mention in an Argentine classic.


The Plight of the Aggrieved, Rich Manhattan Liberal

David Leavitt’s novel “Shelter in Place” dissects the complaints of pampered New Yorkers wringing their hands at a country they no longer recognize.


The Brexit Romance: Finding Love in Irreconcilable Times

In “A Lover’s Discourse,” by Xiaolu Guo, and “Just Like You,” by Nick Hornby, characters couple up as Britain makes a break.


Trick or Treat: It’s Mom and Dad!

The world’s worst parents come back to haunt us, in Lois Lowry’s “The Willoughbys Return.”


Invasion of the Memory Snatchers

In Kory Merritt’s “No Place for Monsters,” an invisible force is snatching kids in the night, erasing them not only from their beds but from everyone else’s memory.


The Mysteries of the American-Saudi Alliance

Two new books, David H. Rundell’s “Vision or Mirage” and Bradley Hope and Justin Scheck’s “Blood and Oil,” offer insights into an enigmatic country.


Upper West Side Story: The Dazzling Rise of Richard Avedon

Philip Gefter’s biography, “What Becomes a Legend Most,” follows the career of one of the 20th century’s most successful photographers.


New in Paperback: ‘Ninth House’ and ‘Birth of a Dream Weaver’

Six new paperbacks to check out this week.


Letters to the Editor

Readers respond to recent issues of the Sunday Book Review.


Marie Lu’s Audience Is the Wind Beneath Her Best-Selling Wings

In a world ripped from one of her novels, the young adult author draws strength from activist fans.


Book Review: ‘Counting,’ by Deborah Stone

In “Counting,” Deborah Stone argues that we shouldn’t put too much stock in numbers as a way to understand our lives.


‘Plain Bad Heroines’ Is a New Kind of Lesbian Fiction

In her adult debut, Emily M. Danforth revisits Mary MacLane’s controversial 1902 confessional diary, with a contemporary Hollywood twist.


Dealmakers and Wanderers: New Science Fiction and Fantasy

Recent releases include “The Midnight Bargain,” “The Invisible Life of Addie LaRue” and “Piranesi.”


New & Noteworthy Audiobooks, From Jack Kerouac to Black Lives Matter

A selection of recent audiobooks of interest; plus, a peek at what our colleagues around the newsroom are reading.


The Problem of Wartime Guilt and Its Long Life Span

In “The Wind Traveler,” by Alonso Cueto, a man haunted by a terrible act he committed as a soldier faces the fallout years later.

 

America’s Refusal to Address the Roots of Violence

Elliott Currie’s “A Peculiar Indifference” traces the history of violence in Black communities and the reasons for it.


The Mysteries of the American-Saudi Alliance

Two new books, David H. Rundell’s “Vision or Mirage” and Bradley Hope and Justin Scheck’s “Blood and Oil,” offer insights into an enigmatic country.


Your Local Bookstore Wants You to Know That It’s Struggling

Independent booksellers are desperate for customers to return, and not just for an online reading.


Matthew McConaughey Wrote the Book on Matthew McConaughey

In his memoir, “Greenlights,” the star of “Dazed and Confused” and “Dallas Buyers Club” shares lessons from a life in which he turned out all right, all right, all right.


Just Like You, Claire Messud Never Read ‘A Brief History of Time’

“I bought it because everyone else did, I guess.”


The Ottoman Empire’s Influence on the Present Day

Alan Mikhail talks about “God’s Shadow,” and Benjamin Lorr discusses “The Secret Life of Groceries.”


Festival Cancels Abu Dhabi Event After Allegations of Sexual Assault

An employee of the Hay Festival in Abu Dhabi said she was accosted by the tolerance minister of the U.A.E. earlier this year.


Book Review: ‘The Dead Are Arising,’ by Les Payne and Tamara Payne

Thirty years in the making, “The Dead Are Arising,” by Les Payne and Tamara Payne, sharpens our understanding of the Black activist and thinker whose influence continues to reverberate.


What Bryan Washington Is Cooking

His literary interests include Houston, Osaka, food and the transitory periods in personal relationships. In his debut novel, “Memorial,” he documents all four.


Trick or Treat: It’s Mom and Dad!

The world’s worst parents come back to haunt us, in Lois Lowry’s “The Willoughbys Return.”


Invasion of the Memory Snatchers

In Kory Merritt’s “No Place for Monsters,” an invisible force is snatching kids in the night, erasing them not only from their beds but from everyone else’s memory.


Overlooked No More: Eleanor Flexner, Pioneering Feminist in an Anti-Feminist Age

“Century of Struggle,” her 1959 history of the women’s rights movement, uncovered previously ignored narratives, like the contributions of African-American women.


Ruth Kluger, Author of a Haunting Holocaust Memoir, Dies at 88

Her “Still Alive” was an unforgiving view of anti-Semitism in Vienna and a feminist window on the war and the world beyond.


Coffee Time for Zora and Fannie, Before the Harlem Renaissance

Early in her career, Zora Neale Hurston made a connection with the best-selling novelist Fannie Hurst — an alliance that would shape her own writing life.


Upper West Side Story: The Dazzling Rise of Richard Avedon

Philip Gefter’s biography, “What Becomes a Legend Most,” follows the career of one of the 20th century’s most successful photographers.


New in Paperback: ‘Ninth House’ and ‘Birth of a Dream Weaver’

Six new paperbacks to check out this week.


Letters to the Editor

Readers respond to recent issues of the Sunday Book Review.


9 New Books We Recommend This Week

Suggested reading from critics and editors at The New York Times.


A Mother Takes Readers on a Journey With Her Autistic Son

Amy S.F. Lutz asks difficult questions in “We Walk.”


Marie Lu’s Audience Is the Wind Beneath Her Best-Selling Wings

In a world ripped from one of her novels, the young adult author draws strength from activist fans.


‘Martin Eden’ Review: Reading and Writing His Way Out of the Pit

In this bold adaptation of the Jack London novel, a young writer suffers, fights and pays as he stands alone against the world.


The Untold Technological Revolution Sweeping Through Rural China

In “Blockchain Chicken Farm,” Xiaowei Wang documents how technology is transforming the lives of China’s rural poor.


Book Review: ‘Counting,’ by Deborah Stone

In “Counting,” Deborah Stone argues that we shouldn’t put too much stock in numbers as a way to understand our lives.


‘Plain Bad Heroines’ Is a New Kind of Lesbian Fiction

In her adult debut, Emily M. Danforth revisits Mary MacLane’s controversial 1902 confessional diary, with a contemporary Hollywood twist.


Ford and Mellon Foundations Unveil Initiative for Disabled Artists

The Disability Futures fellowship awards $50,000 to 20 artists, filmmakers and journalists.