Why Do Trump Supporters Support Trump?

Michael Lind’s “The New Class War” sees class divisions at the heart of America’s current political divide.


Soon a Robot Will Be Writing This Headline

In “A World Without Work,” the economist Daniel Susskind argues that, unlike during past technological shifts, machines really are becoming smart enough to take over our jobs.


Did the Civil Rights Movement Go Wrong?

In “The Age of Entitlement,” Christopher Caldwell argues that the source of today’s political divisions can be found in the reforms of the 1960s.


The Obama Bounce Has Real Impact — and It Has Nothing to Do With Basketball

Here’s what happened when an author’s debut landed on the former president’s list of favorite books.


Down and Out and Ripe for an Economist to Study

For his new book, “Extreme Economies,” Richard Davies visited nine struggling places — from a Louisiana prison to the Panamanian rain forest — to glean economic lessons for all of us.


Larry Kramer Wishes More People Wrote About Gay History

“Most historians taken seriously are always straight. They wouldn’t know a gay person if they took him to lunch.”


11 New Books We Recommend This Week

Suggested reading from critics and editors at The New York Times.


Americans on a Financial ‘Tightrope’

Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn talk about their new book, and Daniel Susskind discusses “A World Without Work.”


Dick Cheney and Colin Powell: The Odd Couple

James Mann’s “The Great Rift” describes the up-and-down relationship of two men who shaped American foreign policy for a generation.


For a Successful Chinese Woman, Can Motherhood Be Her Undoing?

In Meng Jin’s debut novel, “Little Gods,” a teenage immigrant excavates her late mother’s long-buried truths.


The Harlem Renaissance Through Zora Neale Hurston’s Eyes

“Hitting a Straight Lick With a Crooked Stick” collects 21 stories from throughout her career, including eight that illuminate the Great Migration north.


The Union of the Kushners and the Trumps Seems Like Kismet

A new book considers the merging of real estate dynasties and its lasting impact on American democracy.


Looking for a Book to Read With Friends?

Welcome to Group Text, a new column about books that make you want to talk, ask questions and dwell in another world for a little bit longer. Liz Moore’s “Long Bright River” is our inaugural pick.


‘Cleanness,’ by Garth Greenwell: An Excerpt

An excerpt from “Cleanness,” by Garth Greenwell


‘Abigail,’ by Magda Szabo: An Excerpt

An excerpt from “Abigail,” by Magda Szabo


We Loved the Book and the Movie

Here are a few possible directions “Little Women” might go next.


In Magda Szabo’s Magical Novel, a Statue Protects Students From the Nazis

Published in Hungary in 1970 and now translated into English for the first time, “Abigail” is a fable-like story set at a girls’ boarding school during wartime.


Three Books on the Enigma That Is Modern Russia

The lawlessness and corruption that characterize Vladimir Putin’s regime are examined by three authors from many angles, and from top to bottom.


In a Dying Country, Garth Greenwell’s Narrator Comes Alive

For the American hero of “Cleanness,” part of the allure of Bulgaria is that it is disintegrating around him.


Growing Up in the Margins Without Being Marginalized

The narrator of Jessica Andrews’s first novel, “Saltwater,” is a university graduate from the working class, trying to find her place in the wider world.


I Can’t Afford These First Editions, but I Buy Them Anyway

Stephen Marche on why he collects rare books and why our culture undervalues them.


New in Paperback: ‘The Source of Self-Regard’ and ‘Horizon’

Six new paperbacks to check out this week.


Revisiting Robert Peace and Self-Invention

This week, Anand Giridharadas reviews “The New Class War,” by Michael Lind. In 2014, Giridharadas wrote for the Book Review about “The Short and Tragic Life of Robert Peace,” in which Jeff Hobbs wrote about his murdered college roommate.


What One Woman Packed and Another Woman Thought

Readers respond to recent issues of the Sunday Book Review.


New & Noteworthy

A selection of books published this week; plus, a peek at what our colleagues around the newsroom are reading.

 

A Mother and Son, Fleeing for Their Lives Over Treacherous Terrain

Jeanine Cummins’s much-anticipated novel “American Dirt,” about Mexican migrants crossing to America, is well intentioned. Is that enough?


In Germany, a Jewish Millennial Argues That the Past Isn’t Past

Max Czollek, whose first nonfiction book is a rebuttal to calls for integration, believes that his country must face its history with more honesty — and that those who are singled out shouldn’t try to fit in.


A Meticulous Account of Trump’s Tenure Reads Like a Comic Horror Story

“A Very Stable Genius,” by the Washington Post reporters Philip Rucker and Carol Leonnig, is among the most closely observed accounts of Donald J. Trump’s time in office to date.


The Man Who Mapped the West, and the Wife Who Made Him Famous

In “Imperfect Union,” his double biography of John and Jessie Frémont, the NPR host Steve Inskeep brings to life a 19th-century power couple.


The 10 Most Checked-Out Books in N.Y. Public Library History

More than half are children’s books, but “1984,” “To Kill a Mockingbird” and “Fahrenheit 451” also made the list.


Looking for a Book to Read With Friends?

Welcome to Group Text, a new column about books that make you want to talk, ask questions and dwell in another world for a little bit longer. Liz Moore’s “Long Bright River” is our inaugural pick.


Life in Tech’s ‘Uncanny Valley’

Anna Wiener discusses her new memoir, and Elisabeth Egan talks about Group Text, a new monthly feature from the Book Review.


9 Books to Help Calm an Anxious Toddler

These books will help little ones slow down and breathe easy, even during rough moments.


7 Great Contemporary Novels for Teenagers

These books about teenagers growing up today combine literary chops with the special sauce that keep adolescent readers turning the pages.


Americans on a Financial ‘Tightrope’

Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn talk about their new book, and Daniel Susskind discusses “A World Without Work.”


Gillian Anderson Listens to Fleetwood Mac and Loves Toni Morrison

The London-based actress finds time for cultural enrichment between starring in “Sex Education” and “The Crown.”


Their Story Wrote Itself

From the beginning, T Kira Madden and Hannah Beresford found an easy cadence, first through horses, then writing.


‘Cleanness,’ by Garth Greenwell: An Excerpt

An excerpt from “Cleanness,” by Garth Greenwell


‘Abigail,’ by Magda Szabo: An Excerpt

An excerpt from “Abigail,” by Magda Szabo


We Loved the Book and the Movie

Here are a few possible directions “Little Women” might go next.


Why Do Trump Supporters Support Trump?

Michael Lind’s “The New Class War” sees class divisions at the heart of America’s current political divide.


In Magda Szabo’s Magical Novel, a Statue Protects Students From the Nazis

Published in Hungary in 1970 and now translated into English for the first time, “Abigail” is a fable-like story set at a girls’ boarding school during wartime.


Three Books on the Enigma That Is Modern Russia

The lawlessness and corruption that characterize Vladimir Putin’s regime are examined by three authors from many angles, and from top to bottom.


In a Dying Country, Garth Greenwell’s Narrator Comes Alive

For the American hero of “Cleanness,” part of the allure of Bulgaria is that it is disintegrating around him.


Growing Up in the Margins Without Being Marginalized

The narrator of Jessica Andrews’s first novel, “Saltwater,” is a university graduate from the working class, trying to find her place in the wider world.


I Can’t Afford These First Editions, but I Buy Them Anyway

Stephen Marche on why he collects rare books and why our culture undervalues them.


Did the Civil Rights Movement Go Wrong?

In “The Age of Entitlement,” Christopher Caldwell argues that the source of today’s political divisions can be found in the reforms of the 1960s.


New in Paperback: ‘The Source of Self-Regard’ and ‘Horizon’

Six new paperbacks to check out this week.


Revisiting Robert Peace and Self-Invention

This week, Anand Giridharadas reviews “The New Class War,” by Michael Lind. In 2014, Giridharadas wrote for the Book Review about “The Short and Tragic Life of Robert Peace,” in which Jeff Hobbs wrote about his murdered college roommate.


What One Woman Packed and Another Woman Thought

Readers respond to recent issues of the Sunday Book Review.